I still have a very vague memory of the world before the internet. What I do remember very well was, as a teenager, being often told off for spending too much time in front of the computer — I needed to go out to the real world! This distinction between the material, physical world as the real world, and the virtual, digital as somewhat less real has shaped a lot of the dialogue about the impact of the internet on our lives. Only maybe a decade ago, commentators and scholars started pointing out the now obvious: just because it’s virtual…


I learned about Daniel Kahneman’s new book from a colleague just a few days before its release, I read the synopsis and pre-ordered immediately. “Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment” came out mid-May 2021. This is not a review, but only my reaction in response to the authors’ central thesis. And it looks like I had a strong reaction.

Photo by Kane Reinholdtsen on Unsplash

So the thesis is this: human judgment is flawed because of the variability in decisions among people presented with the same information, and when this “noise” is undesirable, it should be minimised. The book gives some 400 pages explaining why this…


As vaccination programmes continue around the world, I reflected on the role that information systems play in the speedy and orderly rollout. Of course, there are glitches and errors, but when was the last time you saw a piece of software deployed in just a few months with little or no prior testing at *this* scale? In the US, CDC lists the systems and technologies involved in setting up a vaccination centre. Others report how technology supports the whole supply chain. And in this article, I focus on the impressions of a very satisfied end customer.

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

The first step towards…


I know that compared to most parts of the world, I’m in a very privileged place: I can walk into a restaurant, sit down, be served a meal, and then even walk into a shop with non-essentials. I didn’t jump at the opportunity right away, I hesitated for more than a couple of weeks. But then I realised that if we all hesitate, soon there will be no more restaurants, even after the pandemic is gone.

So I thought that with a special occasion coming up, yet another one I’d have to celebrate by myself, I may well go out…


I’m very grateful for Zoom this year. It’s not only all the teaching, the meetings, the various appointments — now it’s also all of my family life. Since I relocated to the US by myself for as long as the pandemic is in control of the borders, I only get to meet my closest ones through the same channel I get to do my job. It’s not ideal, and sometimes I have to remind myself to take my student-facing-office-hours-hat off when zooming with my husband. But we don’t complain, because at least we have something.

The problem is: I’m not…


As we continue to live our lives under the now perhaps more permanent new arrangement than we imagined, two polar opposite reactions seem to be developing. On one hand, more than just a few of my friends suffer from being so brutally cut and removed from the world out there that they used to, if not enjoy, then just inhabit with a certain degree of contentment. They feel quite a tangible loss of their possibility to act, to have an effect on the world. Bread-baking helps, but it can’t replace interacting with all the matter out there, they tell me…


Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been putting together some lectures and teaching materials touching, in one way or another, on digital transformation. Little wonder, of course, as this is one of the hottest topics for management students and practitioners right now. But, as usual, concepts appear in conversations on different topics, resurface with new meanings, begin to shine in other contexts, and before you realise, you end up talking with a colleague about the impact of digital on your favourite sport, all on Zoom of course.

Something similar happened to me when I mulled over Vial’s definition of…


Photo by Franck V. on Unsplash

Some of the most recent, biggest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence draw from the theory of embodied cognition, which is “deeply dependent upon features of the physical body of an agent, that is, aspects of the agent’s body beyond the brain that play a significant causal or physically constitutive role in cognitive processing”. Its proponents will argue that we draw from our natural and social environments when we think, and we need our bodies to do so. …


After 11 weeks of lectures and labs, 3 weeks working on training my own neural network, 5 days of an intensive study bootcamp and 1 exam, I can finally reflect on what I’ve learned from machine learning. That is, apart from all these loss functions, gradient descents, neuron activations and genetic algorithms. Apart from weight update rules, selection techniques, and an odd thing mentioned on one slide called Optimal Brain Damage. Apart from a whole load of math, matrices and cats and dogs waiting to be told apart. …


I’m one of those people whose reaction to the pandemic shock was not to frantically scroll through social media feeds and news websites but quite the opposite — to abandon them. Admittedly, at that time I didn’t think that lockdown was going to last longer than 3, maximum 6 weeks, otherwise I might have not let go of my connection with the outside world so easily. A few days ago, I got tempted by Instagram, and I went back to the familiar scroll for a few minutes. After the initial frenzy of liking and commenting and saving for later, the…

Marta Stelmaszak Rosa

🖥Assistant Professor in Information Systems 🎓PhD from LSE 🧐Developing thinkfulness ◾ Minimalist 📓Now Learning: epistemology 🗨 Now Researching: #datascience

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